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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
about the contrast between the u.k. and the united states which i think is revealing, and some world's about -- words about challenges facing the world economy which is more important than those facing individual countries alone. the united kingdom was hit very badly by the financial crisis. total gdp fell by 6% between the peak at the beginning of 2008 and the trough in the second quarter of 2009. output still remains 3% below the peak level. and more than 15% below levels that output would have reached have the long run average growth rate merely continued. on top of that, the inflation rate has been a 2% target. and in the wake of the financial crisis, the budget deficit reached a level of 11% of gdp, a good part of that being structural. we have serious problems to contend with when trying to put in place an economic recovery program in 2009-2010. it was clear at that point that the u.k. needed a major rebalancing of our economy. the shift of spending away from consumption, private and public and toward the net exports whether exports or production to compete with imports. the st
to allow them to pay minimal tax in britain. >> not paying their fair share, despite being over the u.k. on every high street. it's gisting behavior. i pay my tax, why not starbucks? >> sometimes they position themselveses in other country to avoid paying high taxes here and britain. amazon did $320 million in turnover in the u.k. it paid less than $3 million in british tax. all of this within the law but parliamentary law accused them of immorally minimizing the tax obligation. some say don't blame the big guys. >> i don't moral is the way we ought to levy our taxes. it should be set out in law and fairly enforced by the tax authority. individuals have their own moral compass that guides what they choose to do. >> starbucks does appear to feel the heat of public pressure. saying we need to do more. we are looking at the tax approach in the u.k. the u.k. said it will tighten its tax regime but it has not said how. other european countrys have similar concerns. with some calling for more uniform taxation across the e.u., so some countries don't become tax havens at the expense of others.
is and the group hsbc, the uk's largest bank wants to put this behind it, trying to settle the serious allegations, $1.92 billion will be what they will pay the u.s. government, there will be a press conference later today, the justice department, the manhattan d.a. and others to put this to rest. banks operating in the u.s. have an obligation to know their customer and abide by u.s. laws and u.s. sanctions against some pretty bad characters and hsbc apparently didn't do that. that's the allegation of the united states government, helping transfer money for drug cart cartels, for terrorist groups, for countries we're not supposed to be doing business with overall. these sanctions around libya, myanmar, syria and mexican cartels, this is what hsbc says, wants to put the whole matter behind this. "we accept responsibility for our past mistakes, we have said we're profoundly sorry for them. the hsbc of today is a fundamentally different organization from the one that made those mistakes." they were rubber stamping transfers and one economic it any of an e-mail said "what is this, the school of low ex
, this is getting coverage in the uk. i have a friend in peru who had seen it on tv in peru, it's all over the world. mexico is on a global stage right now, and they need to do the right thing. martha: this is an ally and a huge trading partner of the united states, and it's apparent to me that all you're asking for is fair treatment for your son, and that he be returned on what you see as a baseless charge. >> precisely. martha: john and olivia we hope your son gets home in time for christmas and he can share that special time with you and your family and get out of there. and we are going to stay on top of this story. we thank you so much for being with us today. thanks to you both. >> thank you. bill: it's a tough, tough time. jon scott is coming up a couple minutes away, hospitals what is going on. jon: a new report from an independent group. it has a lot to say about what went wrong in benghazi. the tere owe attack back on september 11th left four americans dead, and it says the state department messed up big time. we'll go in depth on that. plus the president just about to announce the steps h
, no doubt about it. has dual citizenship between the u.k. and u.s. neighbor he believes, his dogs were poisoned by the neighbor who ended up getting murdered. i don't know. we'll see. but still no charges. tracy: sunday night movie. ashley: it is, it is. 48 hours will have a special in couple of years. as we do every 15 minutes take a check on markets right now. nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole, dow, at low of the day right now? >> it is under pressure. vix, fear index is so the upside. dollar is stronger. these things are pressuring the dow. we're back worrying about the fiscal cliff. i want to look a couple names hitting new highs, all-time highs, 52-week highs. start by looking at cvs caremark, farmsy health care provider this 2013 guidance is helping things along. they upped, raises the dividend with the upbeat outlook for 2013 that is giving the stock a nice boost. as i noted fresh all-time high for this particular company. we'll look at clearwire. everybody knows they have a deal already with sprint. now there is talk that sprint is offering t
don't know how many of these gangs there are in the u.k. and these gangs tend to put a wedge between the child and parent so that the victim doesn't even know who to trust anymore and won't go to their parents for help. >> atika, thank you. >>> now our fifth story "outfront." the rise of drones. the number of drones has surged. in 2001, we had 50 of them. now 7,500. the machines designed to watch are now looking like fish. this is called the bioswimmer. was developed by the department of homeland security dart into hard to reach places under water and it's not the only nature-inspired robot. there is a cheetah. they put a skin on it. and, of course, the robo mule. both developed by the defense advanced research project's agency, darpa. "outfront" tonight, barbara starr. i know the real new front, drones themselves, have changed the entire way this country will fight war forevermore. let's start with the bioswimmer. what can it do? >> well, this is a very interesting project that was actually funded by the department of homeland security to basically -- it takes the shape of a tuna be
melber. steve. queen bee and managing editor of the sunday morning himself. favorite import from the uk, maggie haberman. michael steele, notorious as we call you here. thank you for your time. indubable. chris solizza. >> i assume they are compliments. >> they are $5 compliments. >> emmy darling. emmy darling. the man with the golden throat. cnbc guru john harwood. our favorite wonk of them all. president obama's money bunny bill burton. >> money bunny? >> given the hop to it attitude. current editor of "now." >> we want to make you the official cultural ambassador of the program now. >> okay! >> we can always count on a little help from our friends. >> always handsome martin bashir. >> you've put me between two of the most attractive people on this network, jonathan capehart. >> i got a title, did you know that? >> this is a legendary moment. >> this is hot. >> this is hot. >> in the days before my time, less known your time -- >> we're just babies around you. >> that's why i come on, to get my wag on. i get my wag on. >> stop right now. >> now! >> thank you for getting me wag on. >>
to the source. fast. [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. >>> the southwest uk is getting hammered with rain causing some travel nightmares. it has to rain a lot in the uk to make any kind of difference. they're used to it. there is floodwater everywhere in devon, england. the drenching rain is causing massive travel problems. with roads and rail lines as well washed over. that's affecting the commute for people. britain's lined up sandbags on the weekend and now officials are warning people about even trying to get out on the roads. parts of wales and scotland are also getting flooded. >>> people in chile and argentina are watching a volcano that straddled the border between the two countries. the volcano has been spewing smoke into the sky. ash has been raining down on surrounding towns. you can see it there. almost looks like snow. it is ash. i'm joined now in the phone by larry masten. so far, chile is on red alert, but no one has been ordered to leave. why is that, larry? >> well, i can tell you based on what i've seen in the reports from the chilean agency, there was
in the u.k. welcome to "bbc world news." also to come, no where to pray for moslems in athens. and a quite at hollywood that revolution, making big returns to the silver screen
in the uk are reporting the story. just simply a wealth of puns, jokes, and the like. kate expectations, says "the daily sun." "the mirror" for pregnant kate in hospital for days. and the "daily mail" has it has a nation's joy, a husband's nerves. so, whichever way you cut this, everybody seems to be delighted. i mean there's just -- there's just tons of tons of papers by the yard. >> can i go out on a limb and say it's just the beginning. you have nine months, and then the kid is born, and you have years of the same exact thing. richard quest for us this morning. thanks, richard, appreciate it. we've heard from brianna keilar just a few moments ago, both the white house and congressional republicans have laid their plans on the table to deal with a looming fiscal cliff which is now 28 days away. both proposals have been flat-out rejected by the other side. former british prime minister tony blair is with me this morning to talk a little bit about what the standstill means not just for the united states, but really, the international community, as well. it's nice to have you, sir. >> th
. >> the e.u. hopes that the space sector will account for 20% of its gdp by the year 2020. the u.k. space agency has been $2 billion for the european space agency programs. the space agency already contributes 9.1 billion or $14 billion to the u.k. economy. for europe investing in space is investing in the future. >>> medical marijuana is already legal in several states in the united states. now, voters in washington state and colorado have ok'd the recreational use richard branson says yes. >> simply proposed with the harder drugs is do what portugal has done and that is, you know, let the state set up clinics throughout america that if you have a drug problem, you go to that clinic. give them the methodone until they're ready to come off, and when they're ready, you use a drug clinic that costs one-third of the price of a prison medical record to get them back into society. >> go to cnn.com to read sir branson's opinion piece about ending the war on drugs. sxwlirchlgts how nasa is protecting astronauts from radiation in space and how florians can actually cash in on invading pythons. we
are doing today. in the uk and p many other parts of world people celebrate boxing day, much like black friday in the united states. retailers offer extreme discounts. crowds of up people fill the streets and stores today hoping to take advantage of those sa s sales. some brave folks in the czech republic took on a freezing river during the traditional christmas swim. the temperature there was 46 degrees fahrenheit. >>> i'm suzanne malveaux. the renewed debate over guns in america playing out is sever fronts today. we'll get right to it. it sfwens fied after the horrific shooting in a newtown, connecticut school that left 6 adults and 20 first graders dead. today los angeles is holding a gun buy-back program. it's usually in may but the mayor decided to move it up after the newtown shootings. >> people want to do something, particularly after the newtown tragedy. now this latest tragedy where two firefighters were shot and killed. they want to act. they're tired of waiting on the congress and our legislatures to do something. they feel like there's too much talk and not enough action,
canada, the uk, australia, denmark, singapore, hong kong -- they have a points system. admission is awarded based on skills, experience, and education. maybe that's the answer. maybe it isn't. in a country that's always favored the underdog, we haven't really put much thought into this, have we? this fiscal cliff fight is going to end one way or another and then the real work begins. immigration reform is ahead. let's keep the conversation going. find us on facebook and twitter. our handle is cnn bottom line. "cnn saturday morning" continues now with the top stories we're watching. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "cnn saturday morning." some are calling it the next roe v. wade or brown v. board of education. the issue the u.s. supreme court agreed to take on that will make history. >> all of those who argued for nonintervention because of the things that might happen have now happened because we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. no
on this day after christmas. the uk and france among those celebrating foxing day. we start off with, what else, retail. dips in spending in the mid-atlantic and northeast regions. luxury sales also weak. >> we're coming off the worst christmas eve for the dow since 2006. as the president cuts short his hawaiian vacation to deal with the fiscal cliff, just five days to go until we go over. >> threatening both coasts with workers snubbing up best and final contract offer. >> and more on the home front. we'll have more on the data and whether it can keep one of the best performing sectors of 2012, home builders going in 2013. >> data showing what some experts say is the slowest growth in spending since the 2008 recession. according to mastercard, spending polls units through christmas eve, retail sales rose just .7% from the year before. the national retail federation says it is forecasting a 4% jump in sales. we'll continue to get trickles of data as we progress through this last week. it is still an important week, the final week before the new year in terms of retail sales for these guys.
is set to open below 13,000. markets in europe mixed after a shortened session in the uk, france and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if thi
throw shows in the uk and three shows in eastern europe. it was incredible. it was such an honor. to be on stage with brian mann, roger taylor, rock royalty. it was kind of intimidating. the first show, we were in the ukraine, and it was 250,000 people. i had to take a big deep breath and just push through. >> what's it look like when you're performing to a quarter million people? >> it's bizarre. it's surreal. >> you focus on one person in the audience and sing to them. >> i tried not to. i tried to turn my focus inside to the boys. >> you did radio ga-ga? >> with the claps, yeah. >> great song. >> and you did some work for the gay marriage initiative in maryland. are you excited or nervous the supreme court is hearing the case on proposition 8 in california? >> i'm excited. i think progress is the name of the game. as long as we continue to try to push forward, things will change. slow and steady, you know. >> we're excited. "divas" airs sunday on vh1. >> yes, sunday. some of the people that are going to be there. jordin sparks. demi lovato, ciera, kelly rowland. >> congressman
if any laws were broken. >> who knows what the laws in australia and u.k. are? when i listen to those ryan roses things and that's happening live. i don't think they're getting anybody's permission to do anything. >> gretchen: you're a standup comedienne as well. >> my comedy -- i'm not a mean comic. i think if i make fun of anybody, it's myself most of the time. and i think you never know how people going to react when you're cruel. my father always said this, you never know what's going on behind somebody's eyes. and you tonight. you don't know what they've come into a room with. so look, a million times we've predicted the end of iron glee this country. i don't think this is the end of anything in this country. there are always people who are willing to go to extremes to get a laugh. i hope people will consider the possibility of what the results might be. this is something that will probably never happen again. it is a unique, unusual, very singular occurrence. >> eric: you're going to be on "glee"? >> i'm going to be on "glee"! i'm super excited. ryan murphy is an incredible tale
hangover. it was worth it, wasn't it? so good. but in the uk, canada, and some other parts of the world, people are celebrating boxing day. okay, so it is like a black friday in the u.s., retailers offer big discounts, crowds of people fill the streets and stores today hoping to take advantage of those sales. >>> we're a few minutes away from the top of the hour and "the situation room". joe johns is here with the preview. >> a lot of news out there for the day after christmas. we're counting down the minutes until we reach the fiscal cliff. the congress and the white house are running out of time. there was supposed to be a leadership telephone conversation today, while the president heads back here from hawaii. senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following that closely, so we'll be checking in with her. we're also staying on the story of the gun culture in america. we'll talk to former congressman asa hutchinson, a man who is very well known here in the nation's capital, a long-time friend of the gun lobby. he's been tapped to lead the nra plan to put armed guards in schoo
when it came out almost two years ago. we said that the uk consolidation would fail. it had too much revenue. as we are seeing now, millionaires and billionaires are heading for the exit. that is what we are going to see. >> thank you. mr. chairman, i yield back. >> i would like to congratulate the chairman on his election and the fine work he has done as chairman of this committee and to congratulate mr. brady on being selected as his chair of this committee and the next congress. for our distinguished witnesses, they agreed that what we need to do is have a long- term solution. i would like to ask dr. zandi how we achieve that. we are several million dollars apart from the president's proposal. how would you close that gap? proposalhe president's and speaker boehner's proposal. how can we get people employed and move our economy forward? >> i apologize. there will be a fair amount of numbers here. the president's tax revenue proposal amounts to about $1.6 trillion over a 10-year period. that is from higher tax rates. roughly 600 billion are from some kind of tax reform. they are al
the british ambassador's convoy, prompting the uk to close its mission. senators questioned how much more the state department needed to see before officials realized they didn't have enough security. >> we've got to close this facility because we can't protect american personnel in benghazi. >> reporter: the report also condemned communication failures. like the fact the head of the military's africa command didn't even know about the 2 dozen cia personnel stationed nearby. senators argued if the pentagon had the resources to respond faster, perhaps the military could have helped fight off the second attack on the cia annex. which cape hours after the first. >> we should have sufficient personnel, ships, weapons and other assets available, to be able to respond in the course of several hours. >> reporter: the report essentially orders intelligence agencies to look beyond terrorist organizations when assessing threats. it recommends intel officials, quote, broaden and deep be their focus in libya and beyond on nascent extremist groups in the region. and perhaps the most damning indictment
" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stuningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like america too. >> politics dem nie
, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> all this month we have been talking with retirin
and repayment would be income base of. their problems with the model that needs to be worked out. in the u.k. needs to unveil this model. students or a concerned about the potential outcome. as the thought through and worked to it. it is an equitable model. the problem with doing anything up front as we did not know what they're earning potential will be until they are actually earning. any model we put up in place, there will be adjustments made. i really think making it all loan based and having loans repaid the base daunting come and the set of rules that would keep people from gaming the system based on their incomes as a better model than trying to plug the holes to increase pell or not. it addresses the up front issues with students who are really the first time it will to assess whether the are prepared to do college level work. this secure the loan debt. if we base on their income, if that is done influence their income, there are off the hook. the model and the funding has to work. i am not an economist. of a buffet and the out with you now. in terms of ideas that i see as games cha
. with that kind of help. the u.k. has supported us very much. we have been recently asking canada to support us on some of our structural reforms. in my case, right now, military reforms. it is getting a kind of support that is allowing us to get into these different levels. not all cases are equal, but it depends on what you find. for most, the idea of intervention and, i think it is better thinking about cooperation, even with the difficult partners. >> i really would like to get to the audience now. we have a fabulous panel. >> thank you so much. i'm from the united states. thank you, mr. mackay for your hospitality this year. this is a brilliant events. i have to say thank you to senator mccain for your service to our country and your calendar, as usual. -- your candor. the title -- of the really are the good guys -- have the special burden. for the first time have been convened in halifax, canada is in the chair of the arctic council. after canada's chairmanship it will be the united states. there are only eight nations making up the arctic council, but the whole world is interested. china
of the capitol. he was a tour guide he showed me the shoeshine boy and says u.k. and 25 cents but if you can afford you give him a tip. there's a parlor shop, the bank, and then he took the on the floor and said that's where i sit. that's where you will sit. someday you'll sit there, by the chairman. and then i addressed mr. speaker and i will address you as the gentleman from hawaii. i will be damned if i'm going to call you by your name since i can't pronounce it. [laughter] and we got to be good friends. he invited me to the texas table because we had no hawaii table in the dining room. and the chicago fellows and pennsylvania fellows and new york fellows were all good to me. >> like your colleague, daniel akaka and former transportation chairman norman, world war ii was important in the event in their lives and in your life as well. you serve in the most highly decorated unit in the history of the united states army and received a bronze star, distinguished service cross and middle of honor. can you tell us what you learned from that experience, and how did that experience impact your pu
and australia and the uk. the political aspect would be huge. >> low-income students are risk averse. they do not have secret bank accounts where they can address the situation. and if they fail, the burdens of being on them. they are less likely to pursue a college education if it means earning more than their parents do in a year. we expect pell grant recipients to graduate with more debt than middle and upper income students. they are anywhere from 150% more likely to graduate. we are burdening those the least capable of the most that. the problem is that they are going to impact access. >> the point before you go on, a lot of that is about communicating to families what this means. it is far from perfect, but they are borrowing well beyond their families capability, baking on the fact that they will be able to. i don't disagree that there isn't a perfect model, but i think it has huge potential. >> i want to move on to questions from the audience because i want to get in as many as possible. i think what is interesting, so far, there seems to be a lot of changes that would take political
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)